The Edge of Tomorrow: A Cthulhian Tale

Hey, so it’s time to talk about The Edge of Tomorrow! And how we apply Cthulhu to understanding its darker implications. But, first, if you haven’t already, check this video out. It will help you understand the concept of Cthulhu better than the average individual, and it saves me a lot of time. Plus, the people at Extra Credits do a hell of a job! So, let’s get into The Edge of Tomorrow…

Edge_of_Tomorrow_Poster

Alright, let’s get the up-front stuff out of the way. The Edge of Tomorrow is a dark action-comedy that’s an unholy fusion of Dark Souls, Star Craft and Cthulhu. And, honestly, I half expected to see Bill Murray fall to his death in a helicopter crash. The time-skips are well-presented, and the general plot is fairly clever. However, if you can think like a trans-temporal omni-swarm creature, then you might spoil the ending for yourself. Which is exactly what we’re here to discuss, so SPOILERS! If you’re on the fence about seeing it, then I recommend it. Take that for what it’s worth, and sorry for the short post!

**SPOILERS!!!**

Now, as we all know, at the end of the movie… …

Okay, now I’m free to spoil it. At the end of the movie, Tom Cruise finally destroys the hive-mind behind the alien invasion, and he wakes up a day before, in a brighter, cheerier world. Victory, right? Well, it depends on your perspective. You see, for humans, time is a pretty simple, albeit baffling, progression. Because we live within it, we value the moments and ages that have come and gone, as well as the future. But, what if you lived in the past, the present, the future and all of the multiple iterations therein?

Well, then you’d have a wholly different relationship to time and, as a result, to military action. Now, if you’ll recall, when The Angel of Verdun first drove back the enemy, it retreated from its camp, and the day played out very differently than it had before. However, the results of that day were simply that: the results of that day. For the creature that was attacking them, it wasn’t really a big loss. Think of it like a cat torturing a mouse. It tests its defences on one side. It swats at it a bit on the other side. The mouse struggles and struggles, but, eventually, the cat just goes in for the kill.

But, let’s say the mouse could drive the cat back. Let’s say it bites the cat’s claw and sends it scampering away, giving the mouse just enough time to make it into the next room. My question to you is: is the mouse safe? Well, that would depend almost entirely on the room and the cat. The same goes for trans-temporal beings. Okay, it can’t go all the way back in time, but it can go forward as far as it needs to. And, there are things inherent in the mechanics of the time-resets that should also trouble us.

Alright, every time Tom Cruise dies, the day resets. That’s the basic event, but does it reset for everyone, or does he just go back along his personal time-line? That’s an important question, because if the Alpha aliens (the blue ground-troops that can reset time when they die) get killed, then the day also resets. So, one would imagine, on the truly colossal front-line of D-Day, at least one or two blue aliens must have been killed in the action, besides the one that Tom Cruise takes out. So, then, there must be time-stream resets that  take place before Tom Cruise got his power. If that’s the case, then we can assume that the time-stream resets are personal. Otherwise, he would never have gotten his power in the first place. In fact, the Alpha that gives him his power dies before he does, so that’s really all you need to know.

A disturbing thought, because it forces us to ask ourselves: what does the alien really want? In what way would a trans-temporal alien invade a world? It’s not just invading you on the physical front: it’s invading time-streams. So, if you consider every single day that Tom Cruise died as one potential future, then we aren’t winning the war because we pushed them out of a time-stream. We’ve merely managed to eke out a space to continue existing. In most other potential time-streams, the creatures dominate the world. And human-kind is extinct.

This is where things get even more Cthulhian. Because, if you listened to the video, it’s right. Our only hope of surviving a creature that unknowably powerful is to hope that we’re insignificant enough to be ignored. So, if you’re a creature waging a trans-temporal war, maybe you don’t care about every time-stream, because some of them must end in your defeat. It’s not likely, but it’s necessarily possible. Tom Cruise weighted the scale a bit, but he didn’t change the fundamental nature of the invasion. We lost everywhere it mattered to the creature.

But, we’re beings of singular perspective, so We don’t really care about those other time-streams. In fact, it’s nearly impossible for us to appreciate the implications of temporal genocide with a straight face. But, to a creature like this, it must be a daily reality. So, obviously, it would be able to reset time if its own body was destroyed. That’s the realization that spoils the ending, by the way. This creature fights trans-temporal wars all the time. Of course, it has natural defences to work within the bounds of its zone of combat. But, that’s not what we see, because we’re limited.

And that’s the whole thing about Cthulhu. Powerful beyond comprehension, because we can only begin to glimpse the facts of its reality from our own. Its structure is so insane that trying to communicate its nuances will get you sectioned or dissected. And for creatures not adapted to the ravages of trans-temporal living, the iteration of days can drive you mad. You see life and death in a very different way, necessarily. (They bring that across nicely in the movie.)

Love, life, memories, death and Being are very different for time-travellers. Even the concept of being born is a bit wibbly. And when you realize that, and scream it at the top of your lungs, but no one cares… no one can care… that, too, can drive you mad. That’s an unheard-of military advantage. They don’t press the issue in The Edge of Tomorrow, but they acknowledge it at the farm-house and within the characterization and narrative. Show, don’t tell, right?

Still, the more I thought about it, the more interesting and tragic the narrative became. And, it’s always a wonderful thing when a movie gives you that experience.

I could go into the ways that different conceptualizations of the shape of time and space would change the “biology” and habits of a trans-temporal Cthulhian monstrosity, but that’s half the fun. And I’m gonna let you have it! Cheers!

Okay, so, there’s a lot of house-keeping today, which is why I’m doing it at the end. The concept video for Mike And Marco went up! Don’t worry, it’s supposed to look and sound that way, at first. It felt more… screen-testy… There’s also a place you can go to hear me read stories, some of them are Grimm’s Fairy-Tale old, and some of them are mine. In fact, there’s a whole live-action section that’s slowly coming on-line…

Our letsplays of Far Cry 3WATCH_DOGS and Silent Hill: Homecoming are chugging along. With many more games to come. So, please, visit our YouTube channel at your leisure. If you’ve ever wondered what my face looks like, it’s time to see it from the other side.

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2 Responses to “The Edge of Tomorrow: A Cthulhian Tale”

  1. Good review. It was a very fun that knew it had a gimmick, and did what it could with it regardless.

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