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Among The Sleepless

Posted in All the Things, Game Guts, Game Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2014 by trivialpunk

What a ridiculous life I lead, sometimes. How insane can you make a banal life-style? I’m not sure, but I do know a lot of it has to do with perspective. And, luckily, that’s the theme of the game we’re reviewing today: Among The Sleep. However, before we cut to that, let’s mention Dream Journal (Cancelled due to circumstances beyond our control).

It’s my first web-series -written and produced by me. How weird could it be? Follow that link, and you’ll find out. There’s plenty more to come. However, if you’re in more of a Letsplay mood, you can follow this link to my Letsplay of “Among The Sleep”. You know, because it only makes sense to mention it here. Alright? We good? Let’s drift…

 Among The Sleep 1

 Among The Sleep is a first-person psychological-horror game developed, using the Unity engine, by Krillbite Studio, a small, dedicated indie studio based in Norway. So far, they’ve put out this game and “The Plan”. Would You Like To Know More? You know what to do. From this small sample of games, we can start to get a feel for the company, because they’re both dripping with atmosphere.

Pains were taken to craft these titles, and while I’d like to advertise for the devs and talk about The Plan, that’s not our business today. Today, we’re a 2 year-old; what the hell do we know about game-development? We’re talking to a teddy bear!

Sorry, flash-backs. But, that’s the basic idea. Your first-person perspective is roughly two feet off the floor and mounted firmly in the eyes of a child. As a result, you see the world a child would: one full of magic, wonder, imagination and danger. I know, that’s more adjectives than I’d like, too, but it’s from this miasma of descriptors that the game takes shape. Because, it’s a game about perspective.

I’m not talking about the angle, I mean how you perceive the world. The meat of the horror elements come from your childish view of the banal world you inhabit. For a child, everyday things are new and strange. Behaviors and understandings that we take for granted can be alien and disturbing to a naive viewer. It’s like landing in a new country, but the place you came from was an existential nothingness. It’s hard to relate the two.

The game is full of perceptual tricks and thoughtful arrangements that guide you intuitively through the levels. Of course, they’re not particularly huge levels, but you are playing a toddler. The size of the maps and the size of the character are well-matched, so the house becomes an Eldritch landscape, unlike any you’ve experienced for quite some time.  The puzzles are clever and very well themed. Although, the door-handles can be persnickety, at times.

But, it’s more than just a good horror-game set-up; it’s a well-executed horror game: one that understands that jump-scares are tools, not building-blocks. The horror is deep; it suffuses the shadowed textures and the narrative completely. There’s a lot going on here. To truly discuss it, we’re going to have to go a little psycho-literary on it, so we’ll finish the game-play first, then we’ll talk shop.

The physics engine works fairly well, and there aren’t any puzzles that rely on it in any annoying capacity. The game-play is tutorialized in an unobtrusive manner, and there are plenty of things kicking around the background for you to find and pick up on. I can’t tell you exactly what I mean without ruining some of the experience, but the obvious example is the drawings you find. (We’ll come back to those later) They’re scattered all over, and you don’t need them to understand the story.

However, if you start finding them, then you’ll start to see a disturbing situation unfold. But what is the story? (We’ll come back to that, too) Well, your mother has gone missing, and you’ve been dropped off at the toddler’s center somewhere in Silent Hill. So, it’s up to you to find the four items and rescue… the… Prin… cess. Well, maybe not. But, that’s the general idea: where’s Mom?

From there, it’s mostly fetch-quests and a little stealth. The stealth mechanics aren’t great, but they’re serviceable. I didn’t really feel like either the shadows or the bushes provided any sort of protection, but if you can put a wall between you and your hunters, then all the better. That’s the game; and it’s an intense experience. Try it out if you feel so inclined. (Its Score is highlighted at the end) Good? Let’s talk psychology, literature and horror.

Much of this game relies on the dissonance between your experience as a child-character and the reality that it’s masking. But, that’s just the start; they made that meaningful by masking something incredibly disquieting: abuse. What kind of abuse? Ah, that’s where they made things more interesting by using alternative narratives.

Crafting alternative narratives can be difficult, but here’s the basic idea: take all the elements available to you, then remix them. Simple, right? Well, if you change the presentation of some of those elements by translating them through a naive understanding, and a wonderful visual aesthetic, then it can become far more complicated. You can suggest far more stories that way, because you’re asking your player to interpret an interpretation of their interpretation. The possibilities are enormous, and engaging your player in that capacity is half the battle of a horror game.

So, how do you cull the divergent pathways? You pick strong symbols, almost archetypes. Then, you pick well-known cultural situations. In this case: a single mother and an abusive male voice at the door. That’s a text-book Disney-Dickensian broken-family set-up. Blend that with some suggestive drawings on the floor, and you’ve got a completely understandable story… (**SPOILERS PAST THIS POINT**) that you can begin to immediately call into question.

Because, the broader a symbol is, the more believable interpretations it can stand-in for. Why is that figure white, but that one’s black? Why are there two figures here? Why is the white one doing that? What is that shadow?

You see, in the beginning, you’re truly worried for your mother’s safety. Something has taken her away from you, and it seems to have had sinister intent. But, again, that’s only your interpretation of the event through the eyes of a child. These are strange, magical events, because they’re unbelievable. Why is Mom acting that way? Who is this other person?

Now, I know I saw the end-game interpretation pretty early, because I lived this. But, I’m not sure it’s as obvious if you haven’t. The Abusive Father-figure narrative is far more culturally salient where I’m from, so I feel like that’s going to be the general interpretation. But, there’s another narrative that can help you get there, and it exists within the pages of psychological theory.

When I was first playing the game, I was looking at things from a Freudian perspective, because there are clearly mommy-issues at play, here. But, are Mommy-issues a real thing? Is Freud really relevant? Here, he definitely is. You see, as unreliable as Freud’s theories are in a scientific capacity, their scope and internal consistency make them valuable literary fodder. His symbols and ideas are frameworks that we can use to communicate complex, emotional ideas to each other.

Which makes it all the more hilarious that I should have been thinking about Jungian psychology. Seriously, this Wikipedia Page is basically all the game’s narrative symbols in short-hand. They took their time with this. One in particular I’d like to point to is the Shadow. The Shadow is that space between who we think we are and who we really are.

The thing is, every person we meet has a shadow, for them and for us. They are different from the way we perceive them, and they’re different from the way they perceive themselves. It makes figuring out who someone is a far more complex problem than we often give it credit for. For a child who implicitly trusts their Mom? You know there has to be a long, dark shadow there.

And, that’s what kind of tipped it for me. The shadows that encroach on you in the opening are literally figurative. Even the goal of the game, to collect enough memories of your mother to access her current location, smacks of braving that dark wall of terror. Of course, I didn’t realize that until I was falling asleep after my first Letsplay session, because the streams of alternate-narrative are well-maintained.

It’s difficult to guess what’s really going on. And, in the dark, you begin to wonder what you’d prefer, which is almost more disquieting. It’s a lonely, frightening place to be for such a small person. (Protag-wise, you can’t get much more dis-empowered than an abandoned child) But, what makes it more frightening is its immediacy and the terrible truth it hides.

Because, for many people, this isn’t a game. I lived through many of those moments myself; I had to make the tough choice that you see at the end of the game. It brought me right back there. But, it did so with some grace. Powerful stuff.

Issues of family conflict writhe deep in every culture and nest silently in every mind. They’re not always our conflicts, and there aren’t always a lot of them, but it’s something we can all understand. You might say that it’s in our collective unconscious; we all know how important family can be, especially when it’s not around.

By carefully suggesting the elements of all sorts of family conflicts (by staying broad, remember), Krillbite Studio was able to weave many different possible interpretations into one game, making us consider all of their unnerving implications, before bringing it all into focus for the finale.

The dissonance between what we thought was going on and the terribly unfortunate reality is another shadow for us to explore in ourselves. Bring your teddy.

I’m giving Among The Sleep a score of: Candle-Lit Ghost Stories In A Thunderstorm out of The Thrill Of Your Darkened Basement. Enjoy exploring the void of The Shadow; I’ll see you on the other side.

All-New Advertising Gimmicks Really Aren’t Much

Posted in All the Things, Everything Else with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2014 by trivialpunk

I’m shared between the rich and clever;
I’m the heart of each endeavor.

I gleam in every artist’s eye;
I’m the awe that fills the sky.

I am love, both old and new;
I’m the reason you can “do”.

Despite our clashing; I’m your friend, too;
You’ll use Me to figure out if that’s true.

Who am I?

The first letter of my name is the first clue.

The second letter begins the Tweet that holds the second clue. It’s the only one from June 26, 2014 that begins with that letter.
Ditto for the third letter.
The fourth precedes the beginning of the end;
And, even though it’s jinxing the entire thing, it refuses to move.

Yes, I absolutely put this together to spoil the title of my first ever web-series.
If I must advertise, then I want it to be enjoyable and challenging for everyone involved!

Good luck!

Marc Married to WTF: Attention Grabbing Title

Posted in All the Things, Everything Else with tags , , , , , , , on June 25, 2014 by trivialpunk

Hi! So, we’re trying one of those smaller posts that I said would be interspersed among the longer ones. For consistency’s sake, let’s also plug a video while we’re here. My YouTube channel has a new trailer! I’m vaguely excited about it, because it’s the first time I’ve ever been caught on tape playing guitar. And, it was an accident. And, as an act of self-flagellation, I posted it.  Because, I need to get over myself.

Speaking of me, I review a lot stuff on here, because I explore many different facets of the lovingly putrescent diamond that is pop-culture. I’m sure you’ve noticed some themes in the things I write about, but I try to keep my mind as open as possible. “Try”, not always successfully, I’ll admit, but the first step is always admitting you have a problem. So, it’s time to admit that I love comedy.

I’ve been watching it since I was a small child, almost as long as I’ve been immersed in the world of horror, actually. Maybe I was dealing with intense psychological trauma, or maybe I only had a few television channels. I’ll let you decide. But, I thought I might use some of these shorter posts to briefly review some comedians. One per post. And today, we’re talking about Marc Maron.

I’ve been listening to a lot of WTF with Marc Maron lately. He’s an older, experienced comic that was a pioneer of podcasting. Still is, if we’re being honest. I’ve learned a lot from the show. I mean, I’ve learned a lot of interesting things, but the things are not the only things that are relevant. (Stay with me, here.)

Marc and I disagree on a lot of “things”, but his method of self-inquiry is infectious. It’s brash and unassuming, humble, passionate and silly. Even if someone thought the whole thing was an act, the act itself is bold. And, I’ve enjoyed every second of the process of deconstruction that the show makes me go through.

If I’m being honest, and if that string of accurate fan-boy adjectives didn’t already suggest it, I’ll consume most media that Marc Maron puts out. Comedians, generally, have a touch of the auteur about them, but Marc’s an auteur of self-reflection, so, I’m always surprised by the way he spins things, because the loom he’s working from is so intricately refined. Coupled with his honest acts of self-reflection, he lets me see the world through his eyes without asking me to buy into it. And, that’s refreshing.

But, he’s not for everyone. Like most auteurs, it’s easier to digest their ideas if they resonate with you on some level. I enjoy his act, because comedy has been a part of my life for so long, and he spends his time deconstructing it in a novel and interesting way. For me, that’s awesome.

So, I recommend checking him out through either his podcast or his stand-up (I haven’t watched his television show, yet, so I can’t comment on that). If you enjoy his comedy “drive-shaft”, then I’d also suggest Dylan Moran and Louis C.K. because they’re also consummate comedic story-tellers. I know these are big-name guys, but if you’re a comedy neophyte, then they’re great places to start. Cheers!

The Edge of Tomorrow: A Cthulhian Tale

Posted in All the Things, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on June 18, 2014 by trivialpunk

Hey, so it’s time to talk about The Edge of Tomorrow! And how we apply Cthulhu to understanding its darker implications. But, first, if you haven’t already, check this video out. It will help you understand the concept of Cthulhu better than the average individual, and it saves me a lot of time. Plus, the people at Extra Credits do a hell of a job! So, let’s get into The Edge of Tomorrow…

Edge_of_Tomorrow_Poster

Alright, let’s get the up-front stuff out of the way. The Edge of Tomorrow is a dark action-comedy that’s an unholy fusion of Dark Souls, Star Craft and Cthulhu. And, honestly, I half expected to see Bill Murray fall to his death in a helicopter crash. The time-skips are well-presented, and the general plot is fairly clever. However, if you can think like a trans-temporal omni-swarm creature, then you might spoil the ending for yourself. Which is exactly what we’re here to discuss, so SPOILERS! If you’re on the fence about seeing it, then I recommend it. Take that for what it’s worth, and sorry for the short post!

**SPOILERS!!!**

Now, as we all know, at the end of the movie… …

Okay, now I’m free to spoil it. At the end of the movie, Tom Cruise finally destroys the hive-mind behind the alien invasion, and he wakes up a day before, in a brighter, cheerier world. Victory, right? Well, it depends on your perspective. You see, for humans, time is a pretty simple, albeit baffling, progression. Because we live within it, we value the moments and ages that have come and gone, as well as the future. But, what if you lived in the past, the present, the future and all of the multiple iterations therein?

Well, then you’d have a wholly different relationship to time and, as a result, to military action. Now, if you’ll recall, when The Angel of Verdun first drove back the enemy, it retreated from its camp, and the day played out very differently than it had before. However, the results of that day were simply that: the results of that day. For the creature that was attacking them, it wasn’t really a big loss. Think of it like a cat torturing a mouse. It tests its defences on one side. It swats at it a bit on the other side. The mouse struggles and struggles, but, eventually, the cat just goes in for the kill.

But, let’s say the mouse could drive the cat back. Let’s say it bites the cat’s claw and sends it scampering away, giving the mouse just enough time to make it into the next room. My question to you is: is the mouse safe? Well, that would depend almost entirely on the room and the cat. The same goes for trans-temporal beings. Okay, it can’t go all the way back in time, but it can go forward as far as it needs to. And, there are things inherent in the mechanics of the time-resets that should also trouble us.

Alright, every time Tom Cruise dies, the day resets. That’s the basic event, but does it reset for everyone, or does he just go back along his personal time-line? That’s an important question, because if the Alpha aliens (the blue ground-troops that can reset time when they die) get killed, then the day also resets. So, one would imagine, on the truly colossal front-line of D-Day, at least one or two blue aliens must have been killed in the action, besides the one that Tom Cruise takes out. So, then, there must be time-stream resets that  take place before Tom Cruise got his power. If that’s the case, then we can assume that the time-stream resets are personal. Otherwise, he would never have gotten his power in the first place. In fact, the Alpha that gives him his power dies before he does, so that’s really all you need to know.

A disturbing thought, because it forces us to ask ourselves: what does the alien really want? In what way would a trans-temporal alien invade a world? It’s not just invading you on the physical front: it’s invading time-streams. So, if you consider every single day that Tom Cruise died as one potential future, then we aren’t winning the war because we pushed them out of a time-stream. We’ve merely managed to eke out a space to continue existing. In most other potential time-streams, the creatures dominate the world. And human-kind is extinct.

This is where things get even more Cthulhian. Because, if you listened to the video, it’s right. Our only hope of surviving a creature that unknowably powerful is to hope that we’re insignificant enough to be ignored. So, if you’re a creature waging a trans-temporal war, maybe you don’t care about every time-stream, because some of them must end in your defeat. It’s not likely, but it’s necessarily possible. Tom Cruise weighted the scale a bit, but he didn’t change the fundamental nature of the invasion. We lost everywhere it mattered to the creature.

But, we’re beings of singular perspective, so We don’t really care about those other time-streams. In fact, it’s nearly impossible for us to appreciate the implications of temporal genocide with a straight face. But, to a creature like this, it must be a daily reality. So, obviously, it would be able to reset time if its own body was destroyed. That’s the realization that spoils the ending, by the way. This creature fights trans-temporal wars all the time. Of course, it has natural defences to work within the bounds of its zone of combat. But, that’s not what we see, because we’re limited.

And that’s the whole thing about Cthulhu. Powerful beyond comprehension, because we can only begin to glimpse the facts of its reality from our own. Its structure is so insane that trying to communicate its nuances will get you sectioned or dissected. And for creatures not adapted to the ravages of trans-temporal living, the iteration of days can drive you mad. You see life and death in a very different way, necessarily. (They bring that across nicely in the movie.)

Love, life, memories, death and Being are very different for time-travellers. Even the concept of being born is a bit wibbly. And when you realize that, and scream it at the top of your lungs, but no one cares… no one can care… that, too, can drive you mad. That’s an unheard-of military advantage. They don’t press the issue in The Edge of Tomorrow, but they acknowledge it at the farm-house and within the characterization and narrative. Show, don’t tell, right?

Still, the more I thought about it, the more interesting and tragic the narrative became. And, it’s always a wonderful thing when a movie gives you that experience.

I could go into the ways that different conceptualizations of the shape of time and space would change the “biology” and habits of a trans-temporal Cthulhian monstrosity, but that’s half the fun. And I’m gonna let you have it! Cheers!

Okay, so, there’s a lot of house-keeping today, which is why I’m doing it at the end. The concept video for Mike And Marco went up! Don’t worry, it’s supposed to look and sound that way, at first. It felt more… screen-testy… There’s also a place you can go to hear me read stories, some of them are Grimm’s Fairy-Tale old, and some of them are mine. In fact, there’s a whole live-action section that’s slowly coming on-line…

Our letsplays of Far Cry 3WATCH_DOGS and Silent Hill: Homecoming are chugging along. With many more games to come. So, please, visit our YouTube channel at your leisure. If you’ve ever wondered what my face looks like, it’s time to see it from the other side.

A Really Worldly Cause

Posted in All the Things with tags , , , on June 4, 2014 by trivialpunk

You know we’re on hiatus, right? That’s why I’m abusing this outlet for the first time in recent memory to encourage you to check this out.  

I’m a writer, so you know I love books, but, also, I owe almost everything I love to the pursuit of knowledge. Both my pursuit and humanity’s. And even though I constantly break writing conventions, I hold them dear, because it’s education and information that brought us BioShock. Dragon Age comes from the stories of “olde”, and your CPU relies on an incredible wealth of knowledge to even be conceived of. The food that feeds us now is possible through technology, and all the interconnectivity in the world doesn’t help if you can’t read.

I won’t patronize you further by spelling out why I think this is important: you get it. I get it. Let’s do this!

Moving On…

Posted in All the Things with tags , , , , , on June 1, 2014 by trivialpunk

Hello! It is I! I’ve been busy the last few days. Actually, weeks, truth be told. Working on this project or writing that script. And you might be wondering, where on earth is all this effort going? Well, I’ll tell you.

I spend a lot of time on here criticizing the work of others. But, that’s because I see those as examples to be learned from, experiences to be cherished. At heart, I am a story-teller. Gaming is my favourite medium, but stories have always been the core of it. And, a little adrenaline-agitating game-play doesn’t hurt, either. But, mostly the story bit.

So, it’s time for Valid and Sound to grow a little bit more. I’m working on plenty of other projects with other people, but I don’t want to spoil those until the editing and uploading are finished. So, here’s what’s going up this week: WATCH_DOGS dropped, so you know I had to put a Letsplay series together for it. I took a bit of a summer romp in Far Cry 3 land. And I’m kicking off a live-action (reading) series with Grimm’s own Rumpelstiltskin and Godfather Death.

There’s so much more I can’t even talk about yet! Augh! But, you’ll find out soon. As things come to fruition, I’ll post them here as up-dates. However, an unfortunate side-effect of all this business is that I’m going to be going on a brief blogging hiatus to focus on the work. But, be prepared, because you’re about to see a whole new side of Valid and Sound.

Until I’m finished with the shooting and the editing, I’ll be reblogging the work of the people that I read. If there’s something you need to know, then I want to be able to share it with you. And besides, a little more exposure never hurt anybody.

Thanks for coming with me on this weird journey. When we’ve wrapped the shoot, I’ll post a couple nice, long horror gaming posts. Probably about Among The Sleep or something similar, because that’s coming up on the Letsplay chopping-block. Or, even, a less disturbing metaphor, like “next on the list”. Although, that sounds sinister, too. I’ll leave the choice of metaphor up to you.

Thanks for always indulging my word-play, and when this huge gulf of work is through, I’ll see you on the other side.

Race The Sun: Inevitable, Yet Unexpected

Posted in All the Things, Game Guts, Game Reviews with tags , , , , , , on May 24, 2014 by trivialpunk

Well, hello there! I’ve been writing fairly esoteric pieces lately, so they haven’t seen the light of day, except for a weird parable post. Today, though, I’m reviewing Race The Sun, so that’ll see some light. Even if it does sink beyond the horizon, dooming us to a dark oblivion.

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Race The Sun isn’t a particularly long game. You play it in 30 second to 20 minute increments, depending on your skill level, and you’ve got only one goal: keep up with the setting sun. So far, so good. Your craft requires you to maintain line-of-sight with the sun, because it’s a light-weight solar-powered craft, and batteries are heavy. If the sun can’t see you, you’ve only got a few moments of precious manoeuvring time before you’re doneskies. Some pick-ups give you a boost for a short period of time. Others provide you with a shield. The green one lets you jump once. And, as you level up, you can customize your ship to let you carry more items.

Sounds pretty simple, right? Well, it is an infinite runner game; you don’t want to have to make too many decisions at once. Because, you’re going to have to be making them really, really quickly for as long as you can. The core engagement of the game is the tension between the setting sun and the barely-glimpsed obstacles on the horizon. You need the creed of speed to lead, but you can’t end up flat as a bat under a very fat rat. And the faster you go, the more likely you are to end up in the latter predicament.

Designing games like this seem like an interesting challenge. You’ve got to ensure a level of variation in the procedurally-generated levels, but you can’t have utter chaos. Part of what lets people play this game is the pattern-recognition. We have a calculable reaction time, but it depends on the stimuli. You react faster to things that you don’t have to think about how to react to. And things become thoughtless reactions when they become entrained physical movements or response patterns. So, they solved this problem by making small, copy-pastable challenge zones. Those challenge zones are mixed throughout the Regions.

A Region is just a stretch of arbitrarily marked terrain, but, as you progress between them, your challenge becomes more difficult to surmount, until you’re trying desperately to flit between two giant blocks that are setting down for tea. There’s a bird or a bug-thing that comes and drops things for you between regions, but I don’t trust it. You shouldn’t either. Unless you’re running on normal mode.

Because, there’s a challenge mode called Apocalypse. And a Workshop full of user-made goodies. On those maps, you can never quite be sure what’s going to happen with the bird-thing, but you can be sure that the ride will be a trip. Obviously, not every map has the carefully adjusted challenge-curves that the main maps do. Some of them are totally unforgiving, and others are just blocks in space. They keep things fresh and clever, and some of them are more elaborate than the base game ever attempts to be. Never too elaborate, though; that’s what makes this game so interesting to me: the psychological aspect.

Were you really expecting another answer? The perceptual experience of dodging blocks is fun, but you might ask yourself, “Why blocks?” In a world of insane graphics technology, why are we dodging cuddle-puddles of unmarked squares? I’m sure part of it is that the game started out as a flash-game indie-project, but there’s another, even more practical, reason: details slow reaction time. Most of your reaction movements are guided by the movement portion of your visual system. The rods in our eyes are good at detecting quick movements, and they’re more sensitive to light than our cones. But, rods don’t see much colour. They’re concerned with contours and lines. Your cones, which are concentrated in the middle of your fovea, handle all the colour. This is why we react quickly, but sometimes without thought, to things in our peripheral vision.

It’s also why your eyes unfocus when you’re “in the zone.” Focusing is for depth, detail and distraction. If you want to react with the best of them, then you’re going to be reacting to vague shapes and contours, a’la TF2 characters and giant, unfriendly blocks. Of course, there’s way more to this story, but this is the gateway, and it illustrates how this game has to communicate. It can’t direct you; it can’t talk to you beyond an opening text-scrawl. All it can do is play on your perceptual experience.

And they take the opportunity to do so. Flashes of light, shaking and sound stand-in for explosions that you passed 3 seconds ago. There are no armies, just the suggestion of lines and ranks, planes and tanks. Invasions by aliens. And all of it fits into the gameplay, even the explosions are blinding obstacles that give you half a moment of vision during which to make all of your driving decisions for the next 5 seconds. For a game that’s so bare-bones, it’s remarkably good at telling a story. In fact, every piece of it is so important to the narrative that I had fun replacing the soundtrack on different gameplay sessions to see what kind of videos I’d create. These are my favourite ones, uploaded in shiny 1080P: Slow BurnPenumbra and Night of Chaos.

So, before we wrap up, what story am I talking about? Well, it’s pretty hard to say, because it’s like an odd Rorschach test, but here’s what shook out of it for me. The ship is one of us, and the pathing we choose is life. In order to ensure that we get to keep living in the light for a while, we need to do things; we need to take chances. We need to get jobs or meet people, have kids or drink sodas, we need to do the things that make up life. Some of those things are tricky, others are dangerous. But, there’s no reward without a little risk. That’s why the power-ups are peppered throughout the challenges.

But any challenge might overcome you; any turn might be your last. And every life ends in death. No matter how good you are, the sun always sets. It always, really does. So, what’s the point?

To chase the sun. To do a little better each time. To see what’s on the other side.

Digital Humanities: Double the Entendres, Thrice the Parable

Posted in All the Things, Everything Else with tags , , , , , , on May 19, 2014 by trivialpunk

I’ve had trouble explaining some of the core tenants of the Digital Humanities directly, so here’s a parable of one of its ideas:

This is Newsman 1. He knows a lot about A. There are a lot of letters in the alphabet, though. 26, to be exact! That’s a lot of letters to pay attention to at once, especially since A splits off into Aa, Ab, Ac…

Now, there are plenty more letters than that, and the combinations get pretty divergent. But, Newsman 1 knows that the people reading him are really only interested in Aa. He knows a lot about that, and there are enough people in the world that want to read about Aa that he can continue writing about it specifically. So, he does. He gets quite a following, which invests him with authority when speaking about Aa.

Now, there are also the people that listen to Newsman 1 because he can explain the news precisely and concisely. He speaks clearly and organizes his thoughts very well. And these people need someone like that, because the amount of information available to the average news-reader has increased exponentially. The number of things they have to know about is insane, especially if you consider that some of them are experts on B-Z. So, they rely on informed individuals to explain the complex nuances of things like Aa and Ab.

That’s a pretty efficient system for sharing information, but it has considerations that must be addressed. For instance, a lot of people who listen to Newsman 1’s  opinions about Aa also write about A or Aa. So, now Newsman 1’s opinions and ideas reach much farther than they did before. Some people credit him, some people don’t. That doesn’t matter for our purposes here; you can’t stop the signal.

This can be a good thing, if Newsman 1 is well-informed and even-handed. But, no one can know all things, even about something as specific as Aaa, let alone anything as generalized as A. That’s fair, though. We can’t expect people to be more than people, especially when they get to something they’re unfamiliar with. Or, when someone comes up with a new idea, like Aab.

Aab is kind of radical. Or maybe it’s counter-intuitive. Or maybe Newsman 1 just isn’t a fan of Aab. Either way, he says Aab is stupid and Aaa is obviously the superior idea. The people that listen to him take that negative impression into consideration when they’re talking about Aab. Now, Aab is always addressed from the angle of being compared to Aaa, which it might not have anything in common with, besides their shallow resemblances or context.

But, how could Newsman 1 know that? He writes what he knows and approaches that as thoughtfully as he can. Maybe he’ll change his mind, who knows? Maybe it’s a political idea, and he’s more on the fence than he lets on, but he has to have an opinion when he reports it. Whatever the reason for his disinterest in, or ignorance of, Aab, he is merely a dot in the chain of the spread of information. Whether he changes his mind or not, that perspective has spread through the web based on his authority on Aaa.

You might be thinking, “Yes, but aren’t there many different Newsmen. Surely, there are people who will provide coverage on the perspectives that Newsman 1 misses.” Absolutely true! But, what do you think the ratio is between people who interpret, then report, on A and those who read about it? It’s minuscule. The ideas of the many are being funneled through the visions of the few.

We rely on those people to be even-handed and informed, to report in an unbiased manner, but they’re already starting from a perspective. Unbiased reporting is a dream; good reporting takes bias into account as much as possible, but it will never try to convince you that it’s objective. Unless the reporters are lying to convince you of their opinions.

This parable represents a type of group-think on a scale that we could have never imagined before. Remember, in a world as chaotic and filled with information as this one, being even a little bit salient is a massive leg-up. It’s also a big responsibility. And it can be hard to know what information you’re actually spreading, some of it’s pretty tacit.

For instance, I used “Newsman” this entire parable. But, there are Newswomen. And, if I wanted to be truly thoughtful, I should say “Newsperson,” because I see the Gender Binary as an emergent, but artificial, social construct. But, if we ever get Androids to do the news or a member of an alien race, then “Newsperson” becomes a thoughtless generalization. And here’s where it gets tricky, if I say “Newsperson,” then will you ever imagine an alien doing it?

And if you never think of it, if it stays a strange, foreign idea, and you’re opposed to it, then how will you ever grow comfortable with it? Or even be exposed to it?

In a world as complex and chaotic as ours, as full of possibility and diversity as the bottom of the sea or the farthest star, the information people don’t address is just as meaningful as the stuff they do. A drowning man thinks only of the air-pocket, but ignores the ocean at his own risk.

So, that’s it: my triple parable. I don’t necessarily agree with all the ideas I put forth. And maybe later, I’ll realize I was being a newb and reconsider. But, for now, this makes sense to me.

The Titans Come

Posted in All the Things, Everything Else with tags , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2014 by trivialpunk

Hi! I just have to get this all out of my system, don’t worry about this becoming an exclusively Titanfall fan-site. I was working on a Titanfall fan vid and I thought: “Let’s procrastinate and make some Titan load-outs!” So, here are some of the things I came up with…

 OGRE-BP

The Hardpoint

Arc Cannon
Vortex Shield
Multi-Target Missile System/Rocket Salvo
Tactical Reactor/Regen Booster/Dash Quickcharger
Big Punch/Core Accelerator

Deployment: This is an end-game Titan and an important piece in any ground-engagement. As a giant hunk of metal and shielding, your battlefield presence is already impressive. But, augmented by your Kit load-out, you’ll be a persuasive force of battlefield control. The Over-shield Reactor ability always comes in handy, especially so when you’re taking some hits for your team in a narrow city-scape. Then again, there’s nothing like the ability to send a Titan flying with a single punch. Use your dash judiciously, or depend on your shields. Particle walls suit other load-outs, but you’re the mobile tank. You can’t afford to be unguarded on any side.

Don’t forget your true purpose: Staying alive and getting attrition points. Pilots, Spectres and Grunts are easy targets for the Arc Cannon’s chain-lightning. And every encounter you survive is another five attrition points denied. Be the shield. Live to tell the tale.

STRYDER-BP

Blaze of Glory

Quad Rocket
Electric Smoke
Rocket Salvo/Cluster Missile
Nuclear Ejection
Auto-Eject

Deployment: You are a missile that shoots rockets. Explode directly AT your opponents. Get them in clusters. Get them alone. Blow up from every available turret. This Titan is a sinister bet: that you can give more damage than you get. Calling this Titan down virtually guarantees your opponent five Attrition Points. But, that’s okay if you gained fifteen in the process. Or, if your team is getting spanked in the Titan game, and you need to level some Titans to level the playing field.

Nuclear Ejection is a powerful ability. Most Pilots are ready for it, but not everyone’s thinking about how much room they have to escape the blast. And, keep in mind, they might not be able to eject if you catch them, weakened, in the epicentre of your nuclear detonation. So, more points for you! But, try to make sure Auto-Eject has the air-space necessary to save your life, or you’ll bounce off the ceiling and back into some serious fallout. Don’t let giving up five points turn into giving up nine points.

ATLAS-BP

My Titan

40MM Cannon
Electric Smoke
Rocket Salvo
Fast Autoloader
Auto-Eject

Deployment: This is My Titan. There are many others like it, but this one is mine. It’s your basic Swiss-army knife. Does well at ranged combat, close-combat, Anti-Pilot combat, and leaves you alive to tell the tale… or to blow more things up. Control Line-of-sight with Electric Smoke, or use your agility to force a Titan into stepping inside the deadly vapor by dashing behind them and applying your fist. Once you’ve dropped their shields, hammer them with cannon-fire, liberally.

Your cannon doesn’t do a LOT of damage at once, but keep it firing and aim for weak-points carefully. A salvo of rockets should drop most enemy shields or tear a sizable hole in their life-bar. Either way, if their shields are down, shoot for the red until they’re dead.

OGRE-BP

The Hoplite

Triple Threat/Mine Field
Particle Wall
Cluster Missile
Regen Booster/Tactical Reactor/Nuclear Ejection
Survivor/Big Punch/Core Accelerator

Deployment: Not every mission calls for mobility. Sometimes, you’ve got to dig in. Hop in and become a wall. Clear buildings with your grenade launcher. Set the line in the sand with your Particle Wall, Mine Field and Cluster Missiles. Watch your enemies weather it all, then Big Punch them back through it.

It’s your choice. Depend on your shield, your Particle Wall or just raze the earth in the wake of your destruction. It doesn’t matter how, you hold that ground!

Good luck, Pilot.

Spider-man and Godzilla: Double Feature

Posted in All the Things, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2014 by trivialpunk

Hey! There’s rarely been a better time to be a nerd, has there? Games, books and music are easier to access than ever before, and they’re making movies and television shows about things that are relevant to us! Cool, eh? But, as we all know, that stuff tends to get watered down as it runs through the process of going from culture, to concept, to cinema. But, hey, the more people get involved in something, the more money you need. And you know what they say about money and problems, don’t you?

Anywho, I was going to go fishing this weekend, but I came down with something; instead, I went to the movies. So, I figured I’d tie this paragraph into the first one by giving you my opinion on “The Amazing Spider-man 2” and “Godzilla”  in the clusters of words that follow.

images

I literally just got back from Godzilla an hour ago. And I have to say, I lovv… haaa….watched that movie. It was a bit weird walking into a movie-franchise that’s classically Japanese and having it redone by Americans. I got eerie Silent Hill flash-backs. It’s like leaving your house for an hour, then coming back and the walls are all a different colour. Troubling, off-putting, but not a deal-breaker. As long as you check the closets. And Godzilla has a pretty big closet, so let’s peek there first.

The weird cultural movie-thing you’ll probably hear about first happens within the opening twenty minutes or so of exposition. I mean… Wow. I don’t want to spoil it, but let’s just say that the people who put this film together weren’t really being sensitive when they wrote the script. And I don’t mean to the material. I mean at all. Let’s leave it at: a nuclear reactor goes critical, because of an earthquake, within a Japanese city. Ooooh. Did… didja guys really need to do that? That’s like having a scene where Godzilla throws Mothra into the Twin Towers, one at a time. I felt a little sick to my stomach, but moving on…

It’s not really out of place, because the central conceit of Godzilla has always been that it represents a humbling force of nature for all humanity to respect. An unbridled power. As you’ve probably heard a thousand times by now, the original Godzilla was a metaphor for the atomic bomb. A power wielded by humans. It was our ultimate power for a long, long while. And I really like how the newest iteration kind of flips that notion on its head. Not in a de-constructionist sense, but it violates the concept by reminding us that the power of the atomic weapon is a force in itself. We merely poke at it.  Between this and Attack on Titan, it’s nice to see a reminder of our place within a wider Universe.

Remember, the forces of nature we’re talking about aren’t Just trees and bears. The forces of nature are reality; reality is an insane, emergent elemental “forces of the universe” team-up. It’s gravity. It’s suns that are so large that we can’t even grasp their immensity. It’s Godzilla. Who, oddly enough, kind of looks a little like a bear in this reincarnation. It harkens back to the original creature design very well. In fact, the monster designs, in general, are pretty damn good. Their movements and animations are top-notch, and I love the inspirations that the creature behaviours take from nature – really reinforces the monster-as-creature angle they’re going with. I mean, they didn’t flash “The Origin of the Species” in the opening credits for no reason at all.

I think Godzilla aficionados will enjoy the lore retooling, given the narrative re-write. The whole monster section is actually done really well. If you came to “Godzilla” to see a kick-ass Godzilla, then you came to the right place!

…for 30% of the movie. They did the Brad-Pitt in WWZ thing where they pick a generic white guy to follow around for most of the plot. And I think, much like WWZ, the movie suffered/was changed for it. Hideous contrivances are thought up to give this singular white-dude character a reason to be in the line-of-fire all the time. It’s not terrible, per se. It’s for personalization purposes, obviously. (But given that Godzilla is a global phenomenon, it kinda undermines the central narrative) At least, the plot mostly makes sense. But, there are plenty of moments in the movie where a monster punch-up is interrupted to give us more back-story about the humans, a’ la Transformers. It’s really irksome, because I came to “Godzilla” to see Godzilla, not some really generic family with a really generic set of movie-problems.

The human scenes are theoretically moving, but the people react to all this monster business with about as much fear and emotion as someone discovering that their milk has gone off. Mothers putting their children on buses with barely a tear in their eyes. My Mom was more broken up dropping me off on my first day of High School. It gets really surreal as the movie progresses. Did we really need these people? Think about it this way, though: can you really have a movie that’s just about two monsters punching each other? Demonstrably! You definitely can. Will that movie make the returns that Godzilla needs? I’m not so sure about that.

Adapting niche films is always tricky, because there might be a reason that a film has niche-appeal. A thing or emotion that it explores that isn’t always appealing to the size and type of crowd that can support big-budget movies. So, how true can you be to the original piece, while also putting enough into the film that it’s appealing to a large enough audience? I’m not sure. I don’t think there’s a direct answer, but this was a really good try. I think they might have done it, if you can ignore all the slow people-scenes.

Don’t get me wrong: We need people-scenes. We need pacing. We Don’t need to obsess over generic story-lines. You use generic, stereotypical story-lines because they don’t need to be fully developed. We know, with a look, what it can mean to lose your child. Or, at least, we understand what they must be feeling. Sadness, generally. Anger, maybe. Fury, definitely. But, unless you have a damn good reason, do you really need to have the entire thing unfold before our eyes, instead of a monster-battle? (If we’re there explicitly to see monster battles, I mean)

It’s difficult making monster-movies, because two giant monsters punching each other isn’t a plot, however cool it might look. But, weaving a plot into it is the initiation requirement for making a good creature-flick. The human plot of Godzilla is contrived and, at times, lacks the emotional tone the dialogue suggests. However, it does manage to echo and tie into the monster-plot in a meaningful way. The main characters are the luckiest unlucky family ever. The best actor is killed off early. Military hardware is shielded against EMPs. And if they aren’t, then why are you using them to transport your timed MacGuffin? And, no, that wasn’t going to be a safe distance, however much Dark Knight Rises logic you use.

I’m not giving anything away, really. It’s all pretty clearly foreshadowed. I’m just saying, now, the things that you’ll be thinking as you watch it. And you should watch it. Because, the 30% with the monsters is fantastic. The cinematography is divine. Even the scenes are well conceived. The transitions between punch-up and human-jabber is pretty seamless, and they get some really good shots of the fights. You can see what’s going on, and there isn’t a smoke-barrier occluding absolutely everything. Oh, it’s still there. It’s just not blocking all the things. Also, there’s no shaky-cam to ruin… stuff.

There are some really nice call-backs to the original films; some of the people involved with this film’s production clearly knew the material. There’s wit and charm in there, and a visual direction that begs to be experienced. It’s a shame that it all hangs off of a human-plot that doesn’t always do it justice. But, the broad strokes are there. The creatures, the lore, the world, and the look. Even the dialogue, writing, and acting are done competently. If there’s a Godzilla 2, and they look over the script a couple more times for localization faux pas, plot-holes and hacky plot-points, then it’s going to be an absolute monster. Until then, check out what we’ve got so far! Just, expect that there’s probably a little more human in your gumbo than is recommendable.

The-Amazing-Spider-Man-2-Full-HD-Poster

The Amazing Spider-man 2… is pretty amazing, honestly. I wasn’t expecting to like it nearly as much as I did. I’m not doing a long review here, because it’s been covered pretty thoroughly by the rest of the inter-webs: Standard intro-Spidey plot-points, with a slight movie-make-over and a bit of a back-story reboot. The changes aren’t really a deal-breaker, because they hit the same notes in this iteration. Guilt, super-powers, responsibility, etc. But, the coolest thing they do with this iteration is actually make it a Spider-man movie.

Do you remember Spider-man? Cheesy one-liners and silly characters. Stereotypes, accents and science so soft that it could function as a non-Newtonian fluid, if you consider inquisition a percussive force. These are generally seen as bad things, but we’re in a super-hero universe, so relax. Spider-man is a teenager’s character. He has their problems and their outlook. He’s fiercely intelligent, but he lacks the experience necessary to be awash in wisdom. His story is the path to gaining that wisdom, and he exemplifies the will to carry on in the face of hatred, oppression, mis-understanding and the unknown. When you can’t even trust your own body, and the world is a confusing mess of rhino-people and living electricity, you need something to stand on. Like a roof-top, for web-slinging.

And the web-slinging here is great. Andrew Garfield started out as a gymnast, and the experience/flexibility shows. This guy does a lot of his own stunts, which really helps with visual continuity. Or, if you don’t notice that, then it’s a nifty tid-bit. Again, the visual design is more than impressive, and I really enjoyed the design of the Rhino-suit.

But, that’s not really what I wanted to cover. I could have summed all that up in: “The Amazing Spider-man 2 is a fairly faithful comic-book adaptation that takes itself seriously enough to actually be a Spider-man movie.” The important thing I wanted to talk about was the villain threshold.

Going into this movie, I was dumb-founded by the thought that they might try to squeeze three villains into one movie. It seemed pretty impossible. But, they did it really well. And, without giving anything away, I’d like to pontificate on why it worked.

Villains aren’t just bad-guys. They bring out something in the main-character. That’s what makes them compelling as Villains. Otherwise, they’d just be thugs. Batman has the Joker; The Joker forces a mirror up to Batman’s face. He shows Batman his own hypocrisy and his madness. The blue-print for the Joker swims in the veins of the back-story of the Batman. That’s why they’re such a great couple. Spider-man has similar nemeses. Doc Oc is his fascination with science, but, also, the danger of scientific obsession and personal vendetta. Peter, as a man of science and progress, understands Doc Oc better than almost anyone else. They’ve both been given power by their obsessions; how they differ in the usage of that power defines their characters.

So, how do you make a multi-villain movie? Take some themes that resonate deeply with your main character: say, celebrity and responsibility. Then, ensure that the villains each explore an aspect of that. But not in the same way. Those of you familiar with video games know that there’s more to an encounter than simply combat. And you know that, because most boss encounters are simply combat. But, people challenge us on multiple levels. Intellectually. Spiritually. Sexually. Emotionally. Philosophically. Down any given -ally is an opportunity for character exploration. Use those opportunities carefully.

Tie the story-lines together in a meaningful way, which should be easy, because they’re thematically linked through a single individual. But, make sure each individual has their own story-line and likeability factor. Now, recombine until smooth.

It’s not a simple task; if it was, then it wouldn’t remarkable or “Amazing”. But, this movie makes it work. It doesn’t force meaning into places where it doesn’t exist by stretching out encounters. It’s simple, because the creators trusted the source-material. They didn’t dress it up more than they needed to. They weren’t afraid to be silly, and they did some pretty damn cool stuff. It’s not perfect; what is? Give it a shot, but don’t expect an epic, timeless tale. Expect Spider-man, because that’s what you’re getting. And if that’s an epic, timeless tale to you, then tell canon to shove it, because I love him, too.

Addendum: However, some people hated it. So, here’s a link to a critic I trust: MovieBob. I can see his points, even if I still remember enjoying the film while I was there.